Skip to main content

Program Roadmap for Hons English Majors at Laurier in Brantford

Although the Honours English program at Laurier Brantford has almost the same program requirements as the English and Film Studies program on the Waterloo campus, our program runs a bit differently because it is smaller and more tightly organized. Our version of the program steers you through your courses in a more intentional way, to make sure that you have an overview before you dive deeper into various subject areas. 

Program requirements (scroll down to see what this means for what you take each year)

Here are the program requirements for Hons English majors in the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Brantford.

The Honours English program consists of 20.0 credits, of which at least 14.0 credits must be at the senior level, and including a minimum of 10.0 but no more than 14.0 credits in English. Of the required 10.0 credits in English, no more than 1.0 may be at the 100 level, and no more than 1.0 may be chosen from among Film Studies courses. At least 1.0 credit must be chosen from the annual fourth-year offerings; EN489 may be used for only 0.5 credit.

10.0 Required EN Credits:

Degree Program Electives:
An additional 10.0 credits for the degree total of 20.0 credits, (4.0 credits may be EN and 5.0 credits may be 100 level). All students in the program must complete successfully the Foundations curriculum: BF190, BF199, BF290, BF299.

What to take in your first year

If you’re an English major (or thinking of being an English major) in your first year, you should take at least three or four English courses.  These should include:

  • Two first-year English courses. Each year we offer EN 111: Literature and Crime; EN 112: Literature and Love, and EN 119: Reading Fiction, so choose two of those three.  You need 1.0 credit (ie. two 0.5 credit courses) at the 100 level to graduate.  
  • One or two of the British literature survey courses. Each year we offer EN 245 Early British literature, and EN 246 Later British literature.  You will need these courses to graduate and to move on to more in-depth British literature courses, so take them as early as possible.
  • And maybe a second-year writing or general interest course, such as EN 272: Introduction to Creative Writing; EN201: Children's Literature, EN237: The Fairy Tale, or EN206: Writing for Business (not all of these courses will be offered every year)

You should also take the first two of the Foundation Courses in your first year.  You’ll need to have taken all four of them to graduate. English majors should take them in this order:

            BF 299: Academic Literacy in the Humanities (ideally first term, first year).
            BF 190: Modernity (ideally second term, first year)
            BF 290: Academic Literacy in the Social Sciences (ideally in the second year)
            BF 199: Critiques of Modernity (ideally in the second year).

Fill the rest of your schedule with courses from other programs.

In April at the end of your first year, if you wish, you can go onto LORIS and declare English as your major, or combined major. As a major, you will get earlier access to English courses when you register, and access to courses -- such as creative writing -- that are initially restricted to majors.

Get involved!  Think about joining the Laurier Brantford English Students Association, and come out to program events, such as our fall and spring socials, or our author readings and workshops.

What to take in your second year

In your second year, if you’re an Hons English major you should take five or six English courses. Remember, by the end of your fourth year you need 10.0 credits (20 courses) in English to graduate, plus the four Foundations courses.

  •  If you haven’t taken two 100 level EN courses, make sure you have by the end of this year.
  •  Make sure that you're taking EN 245 and EN 246 if you haven't taken them already.  

After you’ve taken EN 245, consider taking another early British Lit (ie. pre-1790) course in Old English, Middle English/Chaucer, Renaissance/Shakespeare, or the Restoration/18th century.

After you’ve taken EN 246, consider taking another course in more recent (ie. post-1790) British Lit course in the Romantics, Victorians, Modernists, or Postmodernists.

Take a course in Canadian literature (you need one course in Canadian lit to graduate)

  • Depending on the year, we offer EN 263: Canada Then, EN 267: Canada Now; EN 324: Canadian Women Writers; or EN 309 (special topics) Canadian Culture / Canadian Identity.

Take a course in American literature (you need one course in American lit to graduate)

  • Depending on the year we will offer EN265: Early American Literature; EN266: American Literature of the 20th Century; EN 218: Contemporary American Literature; or EN 264: Topics in American Literature (Moby Dick).

If it is being offered, you should take EN 364: Colonialism and Indigeneity (you need EN 364 OR EN 301 to graduate, but ideally majors take both.  Best to take EN 364 in 2nd year and EN 301 in 3rd or 4Th year)

In your second year, you should also complete your Foundations courses.  Remember, you need them all to graduate. In English we recommend that you take them in this order:

            BF 299: Academic Literacy in the Humanities (take this first: ideally first term, 1st year).
            BF 190: Modernity (take this second: ideally second term, 1st year)
            BF 290: Academic Literacy in the Social Sciences (take this in 2nd year)
            BF 199: Critiques of Modernity (take this in 2nd year) 

Consider taking a creative writing course. 

  • Each year we offer EN 272: Introduction to Creative Writing.
  • If you’ve taken that, take an advanced creative writing course. We usually offer EN 271: The Short Story and EN 270: Poetry, and we occasionally offer EN 269: Creative Non-Fiction. These courses fill up quickly, but English majors have preferential registration.

You may also want to consider taking an Advanced or Professional writing course.

  • Each year we offer Advanced Academic Writing. This course really helps polish your writing for your upper-year courses.
  • Each year we offer EN 304 Technical Writing, and occasionally we offer EN 306 Writing for Business. Both will train you in valuable professional skills.

What to take in your third year

In your third year, if you’re an Hon English major you should take at least five or six or more English courses. You need to stay on track to have 10.0 credits (20 courses) in English to graduate, plus the four Foundations courses.

This is the year when you are relatively free to take depth-study courses in literary history and to explore courses in topics or areas of interest to you.HOWEVER:

  • If you have not finished two EN courses at the 100 level, make sure you have by the end of this year. You need them to graduate
  • If you haven't taken EN 245 and EN 246 take them this year. You need these to graduate.
    • If you’ve taken EN 245, take another course in early British Literature (pre-1790: Old English; Middle English/Chaucer, Renaissance/Shakespeare, Restoration/18th Century).
    • If you’ve taken EN 246, take another course in later British literature (post-1790: Romantics, Victorians, Modernists, Postmodernists).

Take a theory course: if it is offered, take EN 301: Literary Theory, or EN 364 Colonialism and Indigeneity. You need to have EITHER EN 301 or EN 364 to graduate: taking both is a good idea.

  • Make SURE that you've taken at least one course in Canadian literature, and one course in American literature. If you have, why not take another one this year?
  • If you have any remaining Foundations courses to take, make sure you finish them this year.

If you have room, consider taking a creative writing course. 

  • Each year we offer EN 272: Introduction to Creative Writing.
  • If you’ve taken that, take an advanced creative writing course. We usually offer EN 271: The Short Story and EN 270: Poetry, and we occasionally offer EN 269: Creative Non-Fiction. These courses fill up quickly, but English majors have preferential registration.

You may also want to consider taking an Advanced or Professional writing course.

  • Each year we offer Advanced Academic Writing. This course really helps polish your writing for your upper-year courses.
  • Each year we offer EN 304 Technical Writing, and occasionally we offer EN 306 Writing for Business. Both will train you in valuable professional skills.

You may want to take one of your fourth-year seminars (EN400 level courses) in your third year.

What to take in your fourth year

If you’re an Hons English major, as you enroll in your fourth-year courses keep in mind all the courses you need to graduate. If you do the following, you should be OK, but check the “program requirements” on this website, or talk to an advisor if you are unsure if you meet the requirements or not.

  • Make sure you have two EN courses at the 100 level.
  • Make sure you have taken EN 245 and EN 246.
  • Make sure you have EITHER EN 301: Literary Theory or EN 364: Colonialism and Indigeneity. It is recommended that you take both.
  • Make SURE that you've taken at least one course in Canadian literature, and one course in American literature.
  • Make sure you’ve passed all four of the Foundations courses.
  • Enroll in your fourth-year seminars (EN400 level courses). You need to have taken two of these 400 level courses to graduate.

After that, just make sure that you have enough total credits (20.0 / 40 courses), and enough English credits (10.0 / 20 courses).

Fill out your English requirements with a course in British, Canadian, American, Indigenous or world literature.

Or, take some writing courses. The creative writing courses are excellent for developing your creative chops, the professional writing courses will help make you job-ready, and the advanced academic writing course will help you succeed, especially if you want to continue your education.

 

Program Roadmap for English DOUBLE Majors at Laurier Brantford

(“Honours BA English in Combination with another Honours BA Program”)

 

Although the “Honours English in Combination with another Honours BA Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts” (ie. double majoring in English and something else) at Laurier Brantford is similar to how it runs on the Waterloo campus, our program is a bit more tightly organized. Because we have a relatively small cohort of majors, our version of the program steers you through your courses in a way designed to foster continuing relationships between students and continuing conversations between students and their professors.

Program requirements for “Honours BA English in Combination with another Honours BA Program”

(Scroll down to see what this means for what you take each year)

The combined Honours English program consists of 20.0 credits, of which 14.0 credits must be at the senior level.

Students must take 1.0 Junior EN credit from: EN107, EN108, EN111, EN112, EN119, EN165, or EN190;
and a minimum of 6.0 senior English credits, including a 0.5 credit chosen from the annual fourth-year offerings.

The 6.0 senior credits must include:

Degree Program Electives: An additional 13.0 credits toward the degree total of 20.0 credits, including the second BA major. All students in the program must complete successfully the Foundations curriculum: BF190, BF199, BF290, BF299.

 

What to take in your first year if you’re an English double-major.

If you’re an English major (or thinking of being an English major or double major with another program) in your first year, you should take three or four English courses (and you’ll probably want to take three or four from the other program you want to double-major in). The English courses should include:

  • Two first-year English courses. Each year we offer EN 111: Literature and Crime; EN 112: Literature and Love, and EN 119: Reading Fiction, so choose two of those three.  You need 1.0 credit (ie. two 0.5 credit courses) at the 100 level to graduate.  
  • One or two of the British literature survey courses. Each year we offer EN 245 Early British literature, and EN 246 Later British literature.  You will need these courses to graduate and to move on to more in-depth British literature courses, so take them as early as possible.
  • And maybe a second-year writing or general interest course, such as EN 272: Introduction to Creative Writing; EN201: Children's Literature, EN237: The Fairy Tale, or EN206: Writing for Business (not all of these courses will be offered every year)

You should also take the first two of the Foundation Courses in your first year.  You’ll need to have taken all four of them to graduate. English majors should take them in this order.  Your other program will have a preferred order to take them in, so take that into consideration too.

            BF 299: Academic Literacy in the Humanities (ideally first term, first year).
            BF 190: Modernity (ideally second term, first year)
            BF 290: Academic Literacy in the Social Sciences (ideally in the second year)
            BF 199: Critiques of Modernity (ideally in the second year).

In April at the end of your first year, if you wish, you can go onto LORIS and declare English as your major, or combined major. As a major, you will get earlier access to English courses when you register, and access to courses -- such as creative writing -- that are initially restricted to majors.

Get involved!  Think about joining the Laurier Brantford English Students Association, and come out to program events, such as our fall and spring socials, or our author readings and workshops.

What to take in your second year if you’re an English double major.

In your second year, if you’re an English double major you should take three or four English courses.  Remember, by the end of your fourth year you need 6.0 credits (12 courses) in English to graduate, plus the four Foundations courses.

  • If you haven’t taken two 100 level EN courses, make sure you have by the end of this year.
  • Make sure that you're taking EN 245 and EN 246 if you haven't taken them already.  

After you’ve taken EN 245, consider taking another early British Lit (ie. pre-1790) course in Old English, Middle English/Chaucer, Renaissance/Shakespeare, or the Restoration/18th century.

After you’ve taken EN 246, consider taking another course in more recent (ie. post-1790) British Lit course in the Romantics, Victorians, Modernists, or Postmodernists.

Take a course in Canadian literature (you need one course in Canadian lit to graduate)

  • Depending on the year, we offer EN 263: Canada Then, EN 267: Canada Now; EN 324: Canadian Women Writers; or EN 309 (special topics) Canadian Culture / Canadian Identity.

Take a course in American literature (you need one course in American lit to graduate)

  • Depending on the year we will offer EN265: Early American Literature; EN266: American Literature of the 20th Century; EN 218: Contemporary American Literature; or EN 264: Topics in American Literature (Moby Dick).

If it is being offered, you should take EN 364: Colonialism and Indigeneity (you need EN 364 OR EN 301 to graduate, but ideally majors take both.  Best to take EN 364 in 2nd year and EN 301 in 3rd or 4Th year)

In your second year, you should also complete your Foundations courses.  Remember, you need them all to graduate. In English we recommend that you take them in this order:

            BF 299: Academic Literacy in the Humanities (take this first: ideally first term, 1st year).
            BF 190: Modernity (take this second: ideally second term, 1st year)
            BF 290: Academic Literacy in the Social Sciences (take this in 2nd year)
            BF 199: Critiques of Modernity (take this in 2nd year)

Consider taking a creative writing course. 

  • Each year we offer EN 272: Introduction to Creative Writing.
  • If you’ve taken that, take an advanced creative writing course. We usually offer EN 271: The Short Story and EN 270: Poetry, and we occasionally offer EN 269: Creative Non-Fiction. These courses fill up quickly, but English majors have preferential registration.

You may also want to consider taking an Advanced or Professional writing course.

  • Each year we offer Advanced Academic Writing. This course really helps polish your writing for your upper-year courses.
  • Each year we offer EN 304 Technical Writing, and occasionally we offer EN 306 Writing for Business. Both will train you in valuable professional skills.

What to take in your third year if you’re an English double major.

In your third year, if you’re an English double major you should take three or four English courses. You need to stay on track to have 6.0 credits (12 courses) in English to graduate, plus the four Foundations courses.

This is the year when you are relatively free to take depth-study courses in literary history and to explore courses in topics or areas of interest to you.HOWEVER:

  • If you have not finished two EN courses at the 100 level, make sure you have them by the end of this year. You need them to graduate
  • If you haven't taken EN 245 and EN 246 take them this year. You need these to graduate.
    • If you’ve taken EN 245, take another course in early British Literature (pre-1790: Old English; Middle English/Chaucer, Renaissance/Shakespeare, Restoration/18th Century).
    • If you’ve taken EN 246, take another course in later British literature (post-1790: Romantics, Victorians, Modernists, Postmodernists).

Take a theory course: if it is offered, take EN 301: Literary Theory, or EN 364 Colonialism and Indigeneity. You need to have EITHER EN 301 or EN 364 to graduate: taking both is a good idea.

  • Make SURE that you've taken at least one course in Canadian literature, and one course in American literature. If you have, why not take another one this year?
  • If you have any remaining Foundations courses to take, make sure you finish them this year.

If you have room, consider taking a creative writing course. 

  • Each year we offer EN 272: Introduction to Creative Writing.
  • If you’ve taken that, take an advanced creative writing course. We usually offer EN 271: The Short Story and EN 270: Poetry, and we occasionally offer EN 269: Creative Non-Fiction. These courses fill up quickly, but English majors have preferential registration.

You may also want to consider taking an Advanced or Professional writing course.

  • Each year we offer Advanced Academic Writing. This course really helps polish your writing for your upper-year courses.
  • Each year we offer EN 304 Technical Writing, and occasionally we offer EN 306 Writing for Business. Both will train you in valuable professional skills.

You can take your fourth-year seminar (EN400 level courses) in your third year, but it is not recommended.

What to take in your fourth year if you’re an English double major.

If you’re an English double major, as you enroll in your fourth-year courses keep in mind all the courses you need to graduate. If you do the following, you should be OK, but check the “program requirements” on this website, or talk to an advisor if you are unsure if you meet the requirements or not.

  • Make sure you have two EN courses at the 100 level.
  • Make sure you have taken EN 245 and EN 246.
  • Make sure you have EITHER EN 301: Literary Theory or EN 364: Colonialism and Indigeneity. It is recommended that you take both.
  • Make SURE that you've taken at least one course in Canadian literature, and one course in American literature.
  • Make sure you’ve passed all four of the Foundations courses.
  • Enroll in a fourth year seminar (EN400 level courses). You need to have taken ONE of these 400 level courses to graduate.

After that, just make sure that you have enough total credits (20.0/40 courses), and enough English credits (6.0/12 courses).

Fill out your English requirements with a course in British, Canadian, American, Indigenous, or world literature.

Or, take some writing courses. The creative writing courses are excellent for developing your creative chops, the professional writing courses will help make you job-ready, and the advanced academic writing course will help you succeed, especially if you want to continue your education.