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Courses

You’re encouraged to experience entrepreneurship and social innovation courses, which are available to you no matter what your program is.

Note: These courses and descriptions are for reference only. Consult the academic calendar for further information.

ENTR100: Introduction to Business Principles for Entrepreneurs*

This course provides students with the key foundational business knowledge needed to succeed in their own startup ventures. Course material covers the business environment, basic accounting, finance, basic financial, marketing, human resources, and operational principles. Exercises and assignments focus on soft-skill development, such as working in teams, doing presentations, and negotiating.

*Note: This course is open to students who are enrolled in any program at the university except those enrolled in the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) program who are required to take BU111 and BU121. Students cannot hold credit for both BU121 and ENTR100.

ENTR200: The Entrepreneurial Method

This is an excellent introductory course to start your entrepreneurial journey. Emphasis will be on developing entrepreneurial practices, and understanding the methodology entrepreneurs employ to make decisions while building successful ventures, so that you can develop the logic and ways of thinking of a successful entrepreneur. Students will be exposed to and work alongside real entrepreneurs from the community. Explore the career options entrepreneurial skills can provide, how to generate ideas, deal with risk, get funding, and embrace failure. The class will introduce you to the value proposition design and the Business Model Canvas, used as conceptual tools to help shape new venture ideas and facilitate the startup process. 

SC200: Entrepreneurship in Science

SC200 is a 0.5-credit course offered by the Faculty of Science and falling under the umbrella of the Schlegel Centre for Entrepreneurship & Social Innovation.

The focus on this course is to introduce Science students to the world of entrepreneurship. During the term, each group will do real-world market research and feasibility testing of their own business idea, culminating in a presentation that simulates a pitch competition.

There are no prerequisite courses required for SC100; however, SC200 does satisfy the prerequisite requirements to enter ENTR300, a more advanced entrepreneurship course.

SE200: How to change the World: Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship

What makes for a successful social venture?

As part of the Social Entrepreneurship Option, SE200 explores the current practice and potential of social enterprises around the world and how social entrepreneurship is used to create lasting social change. Models of social entrepreneurship will be compared and distinguished from other modes of generating social change.

SE300: Developing a Social Venture

This course of the Social Entrepreneurship Option provides a hands-on introduction on how to design and launch social enterprises as a form of innovation and fostering positive change in society. You will be introduced to the full process from idea generation/opportunity recognition through to prototyping and implementation. You will work closely and in collaboration with other students and stakeholders both on- and off-campus.

CMEG300: Introduction to Community Engagement

This foundational course for the Community Engagement Option introduces the key concepts of social inclusion, local democracy, distributive economics, and community development. You will be taken off-campus to participate in a series of on-the-ground learning experiences that take place in downtown Kitchener.

This course is a requirement of the Social Entrepreneurship Option and runs as an intensive six-week 0.5 credit course during the first half of the fall term.

ENTR300: Ideation and Customer Development

ENTR300 is an experiential learning course where students take it to the next level by moving forward with their own entrepreneurial aspirations. Over the course of the term you will develop and evolve an idea for a new venture, and you’ll learn how to do primary market research with real customers, as well as other experiments to test your idea. You will again be exposed to real innovators and entrepreneurs and work on their ideas. This course will challenge you in lots of ways as you grow into an entrepreneur yourself.

If you wish to register for ENTR300, contact Laura Allan at lallan@wlu.ca.

ENTR301: Business Model Design and Execution

Having taken ENTR300 students will ratchet their entrepreneurial skills and business ideas up another notch by building sustainable business models to execute on their ideas. Again working alongside real entrepreneurs, students will learn how to successfully build and grow a startup while at the same time working on bringing their own ideas to life. The knowledge gained in this course will help students build their ventures to apply into the LaunchPad incubator if they choose.

If you wish to register for ENTR301, contact Laura Allan at lallan@wlu.ca.

CMEG301: Social Inclusion, Local Democracy and Community Enterprise

This core course in the Community Engagement Option studies the processes of understanding and addressing structural barriers that affect individuals at the community level, and explores the collaborative infrastructures and concepts of fair distribution of resources and knowledge. Relevant themes, concepts, and models of local democracy, community development, distributive economics and inclusion are investigated through engaged learning experiences at The Working Centre in downtown Kitchener.

This course runs as an intensive six-week 0.5 credit course during the second half of the fall term (following CMEG300).

CMEG305: Semester in Community Engagement (1.0)

Through the capstone course in the Community Engagement Option, you will learn to apply community engagement theories and principles working toward a project or enterprise with your colleagues that will make a positive contribution in the community.

​​ENTR310: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

This intensive three-week course takes place in August and examines the different entrepreneurial ecosystems in Canada and Israel, studying the similarities and differences between these ecosystems and how they encourage entrepreneurial activity. The course starts with students from Laurier and our partner school in IDC Herzliya studying the Waterloo-Toronto ecosystem and then travelling to Israel, working on live case studies with startups in both locations. Travel and accommodations are generously covered by the Schwartz-Reisman Foundation, and students must apply to be accepted for the limited spots available.

BU321: Social Entrepreneurship

This course provides an understanding of the process of starting a new business dedicated to tackling social or environmental issues. The characteristics of social entrepreneurs, the identification and evaluation of opportunities, the assembly of resources and the development of a sustainable social business model will be covered. Students will work on building their own social enterprise based on social problems they are passionate about solving.

SE364: Social Innovation in the City

At the heart of the CityStudio initiative, this course offers you the opportunity to learn the latest techniques that are being used to problem solve social and community challenges all over the world, develop your research and consultation skills as well as design an actual solution to a real social, economic or environmental challenge.

Working closely with the City of Waterloo, you will present your findings at City Hall at the end of the course. The most promising ideas that emerge from this course are then developed further through student summer internships awarded to the best performing students in the course. The results of the internship will go back to the City to assist them in the process of creating actual policy.

This course may be counted towards the Social Entrepreneurship Option.

SE350: Social Innovation and Culture

Learn how cultural contexts influence the practices and aims of social innovation. Case studies explore how novel approaches to collaboration and entrepreneurship can draw on culture as a key resource for positive change. In this course, you will experience hands-on learning and collaborative inquiry in partnership with organizations on- and off-campus.

This course may be counted towards the Social Entrepreneurship Option.

SE400: Capstone in Social Entrepreneurship (1.0)

In this course, you become a social entrepreneur! Social Entrepreneurship faculty members, who are also seasoned social entrepreneurs, will be your coaches as you design, create – and launch – your own social enterprise, an enterprise that will generate social impact and may even become your future career.

The Social Entrepreneurship Option can take you wherever you wish to go.

BU403: Entrepreneurial Finance

The primary focus of this course is on the financial challenges confronting small and medium sized businesses that are growing rapidly or aspire to rapid growth. In particular, you will concentrate on understanding the financing problems firms confront at different stages, and become familiar with the different sources of funds and the tax and regulatory environment within with the funds are obtained. Students will also learn the key elements of structuring financing deals.

BU421: Managing the Family Enterprise

This course is designed to enhance awareness of the significance, diversity and complexity of family business. You will develop an understanding of the distinctive advantages and challenges of family firms, enhancing your ability to develop strategic solutions to improve the performance of family firms. Topics include but are not limited to: duality of business and family roles, intergenerational relations, sibling relations, conflict resolution, mate selection, governance structures for family firms, non-family executives, next generation commitment and consulting to family firms.

BU460: Laurier Startup Fund

The Laurier Startup Fund course is an experiential learning opportunity for senior business students to evaluate and ultimately invest in budding businesses. By working with a strong community of established investors, students gain valuable hands-on experience in being angel investors. BU460 is essentially a practicum that gives senior undergraduate and graduate students a hands-on education in early stage investing with companies that are growing rapidly or aspire to rapid growth.

Complete the Startup Fund Course Application Form to be considered for acceptance into the course.

 

BU611: Entrepreneurship for MBAs

An understanding of the process of starting a new business, including the study of the characteristics of the entrepreneur, the identification and evaluation of opportunities, the assembly of resources and the development of the business plan. Franchising and starting a new venture by an established company are also examined.

SK632b: Entrepreneurship for Social Workers

This course is a focused introduction to social entrepreneurship designed with the assumption that you have little or no business or enterprise experience. Students are exposed to the full process from idea generation/opportunity (as social change agents) recognition through to venture creation; all in the context of social change.

BU660: Laurier Startup Fund

The Laurier Startup Fund is an experiential learning opportunity for senior business students to evaluate and ultimately invest in budding businesses. By working with a strong community of established investors, students gain valuable hands-on experience in being angel investors.

Complete the Startup Fund Course Application Form to be considered for acceptance into the course.